Because every Sunday is a feast day

and every Saturday night is like the Easter Vigil…

charcoal stoking in chimney starter

“Come, eat of my [BBQ].”
Proverbs 9,5a

unlit charcoal and mesquite prepared with empty center
in bottom of Weber Smokey Mountain Cooker

hot coals added to the smoker

and away we go.

Read this explanation of the various methods of starting the smoker,
also applicable to your regular charcoal grill.

Meanwhile, in the kitchen…

Beef Brisket.
Fat side up. Point on the left. Flat on the right.

Read this article at Weber Virtial Bullet to learn about brisket selection and preparation.

1/8 cup salt, 1/8 cup pepper, 1/8 cup paprika, 1 TBSP garlic powder,
1 tsp dry mustard, 10 shakes Worcestershire.

Beef Brisket with rub.
Fat side down. Point on right. Flat on left.

Read this recipe for more details.

The Weber is smokey, steamy and ready,

the meat goes in, the top goes on…

and the top vent fills the night with signs and smells of good things to come.

A 10 pound brisket needs more time under smoke than an 8 pound Boston Butt. Now it’s time to prepare the pig. Read this so that you buy the right pork shoulder: butt not picnic.

1/4 cup salt, 1/4 cup pepper, 1/4 cup paprika, 1/4 cup garlic powder,
1/4 cup regular or light brown sugar, 1/4 cup dark brown or raw cane sugar,
1/8 cup cayenne pepper, 1/8 cup crushed red pepper

covering every surface and crevice of the pork shoulder.

Then the prepared pig, wrapped tight in heavy duty aluminum foil and sitting inside a deep foil roasting pan (all done so as to prevent pork from dripping on beef), is put on the top grate in the smoker, an hour after the brisket.

If you don’t want your lips tingling, consider instead this classic recipe on Virtual Weber Bullet. If you want to melt a hole through your heart, double the cayenne.

Now go to bed.

But wake up several times, after every hour or two, to check the temperature on the smoker, adjusting the air vents accordingly to keep the temp between 220 and 240 while leaving open the top vent as much as possible, and add mesquite (or oak) to the charcoal chamber.

Eventually you will collapse, hopefully on something soft, only to be greeted by the wondrous sight of transformed flesh.

God is good.

After 7.5 hours of 225 degrees, the brisket is well on its way. The foil sealing up the pork is opened to expose completely the top of the roasting pan. No turning, no basting and no wrapping in foil of the brisket. It only needs an internal thermometer to be inserted…

Meet the least expensive high quality BBQ meat thermometer.

and the lid to be closed.

The target for brisket internal temp is between 188 and 190 degrees,
allowing it to get up to 205 degrees.

Time to make the slaw.

Half a bottle of lite blue cheese dressing for each bag of cole slaw
with a few spritzes of lemon juice and a few sprinkles of salt.

Mmm mmm mmm.

Now a word from our sponsor.

Their work is done. Back in the trashcan, boys.

Wicked Good Charcoal and Maine Grilling Woods also are great choices. Just be sure to use good, natural, non-contraceptive non-“Match Light” charcoal and wood.

After twelve and eleven hours for the brisket and pork respectively, they are ready to be sealed in foil and allowed to rest for half an hour before the beef is removed from the foil and sliced and the pig is pulled apart carefully with forks or fork and knife while staying in its roasting pan.

Good, good,

good, good, good.

This may invite speculation about the Q Source, but not all questions can be answered.

Southern Living publishes a great guide that includes fine recipes and excellent explanations of basic techniques that otherwise go without mention in other cookbooks:
Big Book of BBQ.

Cheers.

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